My lair

I like things.

September 29, 2014 1:32 pm
"How can one not dream while writing? It is the pen which dreams. The blank page gives the right to dream."
September 26, 2014 6:17 pm
"It’s OK not to be a genius, whatever that is, if there even is such a thing…the creative life may or may not be the apex of human civilization, but either way it’s not what I thought it was. It doesn’t make you special and sparkly. You don’t have to walk alone. You can work in an office — I’ve worked in offices for the past 15 years and written five novels while doing it. The creative life is forgiving: You can betray it all you want, again and again, and no matter how many times you do, it will always take you back."

Lev Grossman manages to smash “you don’t have to be a genius” and “keep your day job” into his great essay, "How Not to Write a Novel" (his book, The Magician’s Land, is out this week)

(Source: annajarzab, via thekrissychula)

September 18, 2014 11:03 am
"You have to surrender to your mediocrity, and just write. Because it’s hard, really hard, to write even a crappy book. But it’s better to write a book that kind of sucks rather than no book at all, as you wait around to magically become Faulkner. (…) No one is going to write your book for you … and you can’t write anybody’s book but your own."

Cheryl Strayed, quoted by Wes Janisen in the July 25, 2013 Thought Catalog article “Don’t Run From Who You Are: Writing Advice From George Saunders & Cheryl Strayed” (via sterlingfink)
September 17, 2014 11:42 pm
"Screenwriting Tip: 3 pages a day can = 90 pages done in 30 days."
September 11, 2014 8:35 am September 3, 2014 9:55 pm
"you can, you should, and if you’re brave enough to start, you will."

Stephen King, On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft (via feellng)
September 2, 2014 1:05 pm
writersrelief:

Writers: How To Let Go Of The Pressure To Be Perfect
For most writers, a little perfectionism isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The drive to create stories, poems, essays, and books that are perfect can propel a writer’s skills from “just okay” to “stellar”—and ultimately publishable.
But perfectionism also has a dark side: If you’re a perfectionist writer, you probably agonize over every word each step of the way. Your inner critic is an ogre. No matter how often you rewrite and revise, you’re unable to accept that a given piece is done, and so you don’t submit it for publication. Or maybe you shy away from sharing your writing at all, convinced of its inadequacies. The process that should be a fun, joyful, and creative experience instead becomes fraught with worry and imagined disapproval. When perfectionism is at its worst, it leads to writer’s block (Such as: If I can’t write anything good, I won’t write at all).
When the pressure to be perfect is overwhelming, try some of these encouraging techniques.

writersrelief:

Writers: How To Let Go Of The Pressure To Be Perfect

For most writers, a little perfectionism isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The drive to create stories, poems, essays, and books that are perfect can propel a writer’s skills from “just okay” to “stellar”—and ultimately publishable.

But perfectionism also has a dark side: If you’re a perfectionist writer, you probably agonize over every word each step of the way. Your inner critic is an ogre. No matter how often you rewrite and revise, you’re unable to accept that a given piece is done, and so you don’t submit it for publication. Or maybe you shy away from sharing your writing at all, convinced of its inadequacies. The process that should be a fun, joyful, and creative experience instead becomes fraught with worry and imagined disapproval. When perfectionism is at its worst, it leads to writer’s block (Such as: If I can’t write anything good, I won’t write at all).

When the pressure to be perfect is overwhelming, try some of these encouraging techniques.

August 27, 2014 10:17 am
annerocious:

The Journey of the Drafts

annerocious:

The Journey of the Drafts

(Source: l-ettie)

August 4, 2014 11:48 pm
HOW TO CONFLICT

annerocious:

image

Never AND. Always OR.

Real dramatic conflict gives the protag a choice. This OR That. Success OR Failure. Save the mother OR the child. Capitulate to the antagonist OR get shot.

Conflict that has a lot of options is not real conflict.

The protagonist is free to save the mother AND the…

July 18, 2014 1:24 pm

CHARACTER COMES FIRST

annerocious:

Plots flow out of personalities.

i.e.

The more interesting the character, the more interesting your plot choices become.

i.e.

Basic characters beget basic plots.

i.e.

Don’t be basic.

July 6, 2014 6:20 pm
"As for unlikable characters: I’ve always said I don’t mind if a character isn’t likable as long as he or she is understandable. Do I get why these people are doing the awful things they do? I think that’s why I often include backstories about childhood—if you understand what circumstances or people created a person, I think you have more empathy. And humor. Libby Day, Nick and Amy Dunne—they do awful things, but they’re very self-aware and fairly funny at times. I think you can forgive a lot if a person make you laugh (even if you know you shouldn’t be laughing)."
July 1, 2014 2:07 pm

Life, Plot, Story

mooderino:

A story is more than stuff that happens to a person. And yet, if a friend were to tell you something that happened to them at work or at school or wherever, you wouldn’t be uninterested.

In fact, if it was something amusing or surprising or touching in some way, it might even be quite compelling. This incident might involve coincidence, luck, randomness and have no real conclusion, but that won’t necessarily stop you hanging on every word.

However, put that same story down in print, and it doesn’t have quite the same effect. Now it’s contrived and pointless and banal.

Why? What makes fiction—whether it be a short story or a novel—different from real life? And how can we use this difference to help create more engaging and entertaining stories?

Read More

June 27, 2014 5:17 am June 19, 2014 6:39 pm

for people that write or do art stuff how do you do your work without planning it? 

like lets even say its something you have no plans to release or show but you’re just in the mood to shit something out. how do you get yourself to shit it? i can never shit anything and i really really wanna. 

10:53 am

First Drafts

title2come:

image

Submitted by Amanda

(via annerocious)